Login
 
Main Data
Author: Aristotle
Title: Politics
Publisher: Ktoczyta.pl
ISBN/ISSN: 9788382173369
Edition: 1
Price: CHF 3.40
Publication date: 01/01/2020
Content
Category: Geschichte
Language: English
Technical Data
Pages: 277
Kopierschutz: Wasserzeichen
Geräte: PC/MAC/eReader/Tablet
Formate: ePUB
Table of contents
The treatise is divided into 8 chapters (books), each of which is devoted to a particular topic. First of all, in the first book, Aristotle begins his concept with the very concept of 'state', since without understanding this term one can forget about further theory. In the second book, Aristotle undertakes to criticize the already existing theories about the state, namely the theory of Plato, Faley of Chalkedon, Hippodamus; It also analyzes and analyzes the states and their devices that existed during it - Crete, Athens, Carthage, Lacedaemon.
Table of contents

Book One

I

EVERY STATE is a community of some kind, and every community is established with a view to some good; for mankind always act in order to obtain that which they think good. But, if all communities aim at some good, the state or political community, which is the highest of all, and which embraces all the rest, aims at good in a greater degree than any other, and at the highest good.

Some people think that the qualifications of a statesman, king, householder, and master are the same, and that they differ, not in kind, but only in the number of their subjects. For example, the ruler over a few is called a master; over more, the manager of a household; over a still larger number, a statesman or king, as if there were no difference between a great household and a small state. The distinction which is made between the king and the statesman is as follows: When the government is personal, the ruler is a king; when, according to the rules of the political science, the citizens rule and are ruled in turn, then he is called a statesman.

But all this is a mistake; for governments differ in kind, as will be evident to any one who considers the matter according to the method which has hitherto guided us. As in other departments of science, so in politics, the compound should always be resolved into the simple elements or least parts of the whole. We must therefore look at the elements of which the state is composed, in order that we may see in what the different kinds of rule differ from one another, and whether any scientific result can be attained about each one of them.

II

He who thus considers things in their first growth and origin, whether a state or anything else, will obtain the clearest view of them. In the first place there must be a union of those who cannot exist without each other; namely, of male and female, that the race may continue (and this is a union which is formed, not of deliberate purpose, but because, in common with other animals and with plants, mankind have a natural desire to leave behind them an image of themselves), and of natural ruler and subject, that both may be preserved. For that which can foresee by the exercise of mind is by nature intended to be lord and master, and that which can with its body give effect to such foresight is a subject, and by nature a slave; hence master and slave have the same interest. Now nature has distinguished between the female and the slave. For she is not niggardly, like the smith who fashions the Delphian knife for many uses; she makes each thing for a single use, and every instrument is best made when intended for one and not for many uses. But among barbarians no distinction is made between women and slaves, because there is no natural ruler among them: they are a community of slaves, male and female. Wherefore the poets say,

It is meet that Hellene